Answers The Blue Bead Treasure Trove

Answers The Blue Bead Treasure Trove

Q.What was the “blue bead” which forms the title of the story by Norah Burke?

Answer: “The Blue Bead” may seem to be a confusing and improper title for the story written by Norah Burke. But on philosophy-based, we discover that the title is really quite acceptable. It tells us more about the personality of Sibia who is a straightforward, respectful, and humble girl.
The blue bead was in actuality a part of sand-worn glass that had been proceeding about in the river for a long time. By chance, it had a gap in it that could be used as a jewel in a piece of jewelry. It was glistening like a blue jewel when the courageous teenager Sibia discovered it at the shallow sandbank. The girl is tremendously thrilled and ecstatic to have it, but while it’s not a true gem. She doesn’t really speak about her act of courage in saving the life of the Gujar woman. She doesn’t want any prize or recognition for her brave act. She thinks herself rewarded handsomely with the piece of glass that she can dress in a thread or necklace around her neck. This is a great example of child-like conviction and elegance.

Q. Describe the greatness with which the crocodile has been explained in the narrative.

Answer: The mugger crocodile was brown or black-brown in color and had a light yellow bottom. The narrative describes him as one of the most antiquity monsters ever, for hundred years earlier it fertilized from its shell under the sun. The crocodile is represented in all its grandeur, as being twice as tall as the tallest man and larger than life. The crocodile is described in awe-inspiring detail, and the story suggests that he is propelled by some force.

Q.. What do you mean by “sleepers”? What caused the logs to float downstream?

Sleepers are rectangle pieces of wood, stone, or steel that are cut specifically for constructions and railroad track installation.

Water has a lower density than timber. As a result, it floats. The British used rivers to deliver wood, not by boats, but by floating it till it reached its goal.

Q.What did the massive crocodile eat?

He ate fish, as well as deer and monkeys that came to drink, a duck or two, bodies, and dogs.

Q.What was the crocodile’s age? How big is it?

The crocodile was most likely over a century old. He was about the same height as a tall man.

Q.What presented a threat to him as a child?

When he was a bay crocodile, birds of prey and large predatory fish that consume juvenile crocodiles posed a threat to his existence.

Q, How did the crocodile get to its current length?

Answer : As a young crocodile, he successfully avoided birds of prey and bigger fishes, and his diet consisted of anything he could ingest, from little fish to insects, deer and monkeys, everything rotted in his stomach.

Q.Did the crocodile have invincibility? How could he have been struck?

The crocodile’s thick skin rendered him invulnerable. There was nothing that could pierce through his thick, nearly inch-thick skin. Even rifle rounds may bounce off him if fired at him. Only his eyes and sensitive underarms were vulnerable, and if damaged, they could kill him.

Q. Describe the tiny girl’s physical appearance.

Ans. The young lady was perhaps twelve years old. Her skin was an oily dark color. She was frail and dark-skinned. colored. Her hair was black and her eyes were large. Her straight white teeth shone brightly as she chewed her food.

Q.What country did the little girl originate from? What was she dressed in? What was she munching on?

Ans. Above the ford, the small girl came from a strident, boisterous village. She was dressed in a neutral hue. She had divided the rag into two pieces, one for a skirt and the other for a sari. She was chowing down on chapattis.

Q. Summarize the Gujar women’s looks.

The Gujar women were wearing tight, wrinkled-at-the-ankles trousers, thick silver rings made out of melted rupees in their ears, and one of them was clinking a stick against by the great brass hurrahs in which they drew river water for the encampment, to see which one was empty, as recounted in the story. They used to cut grass by rolling up their skirts and climbing the slope.

Q.Who are the Gujars, and what do they do?

As stated in the short story “The Blue Bead,” For generations, Gujars were the people who were born and raised in the country. They scratched their food together to make a life from animals, grass, and trees. They had silver jewelry and kept their substance in vast herds. They were the postal age’s wanderers.

Q.Provide evidence indicating the girl came from a disadvantaged family.

Ans. The girl came from a poor family because she resided in a mud hut and wore an earthenware dress. She separated the rag into two pieces, one for a skirt and the other for a sari. Her family was unable to help her. . She’d never owned a single anna-nota pice, let alone a pi.

Q.How did the tiny child get here? What was she dressed in? What was she munching on?

Ans. Above the ford, the small girl came from a strident, boisterous village. She was dressed in a neutral hue. She had divided the rag into two pieces, one for a skirt and the other for a sari. She was eating chapattis with green chillies and rancid butter on them.

Q.Describe the small girl’s physical appearance.

Ans. The young lady was perhaps twelve years old. Her skin was an oily dark color. She was petite and dark-skinned. Her hair was black and her eyes were large. Her straight white teeth shone brightly as she chewed her food.

Q.What did the women do for the majority of the day? What was the agent’s role?
Answer: The women struggled all day to collect the paper grass, then transported it to the railhead by bullock cart and sold it to the agency. It was delivered to the paper mills by the agent.

Q.When Sibia traveled with her mother, what did she bring with her?

When Sibia went with her mother, she brought her sickle and hayfork with her.

Q.Why wasn’t Sibia able to skip on her trip back from the cliffs?

Answer: Sibia couldn’t skip on her trip back from the cliffs since she was fatigued and carried a heavy weight on her head.

Q.. Give a brief description of the nomadic graziers’ campsite, which serves as the setting for the story “The Blue Bead.”

The itinerant graziers were housed in a Gujar encampment. They’d stay as long as there was green grass for their cattle to graze on. They would frequently stay in the area until their supply of white butter and milk was depleted before moving on. They sometimes had to wait until their young male buffaloes were sold for tiger bait before they could sell them. There were occasions when a cattle-killing tiger proved to be a nuisance for their livestock, and they were forced to stay in the encampment for a further period of time.

The Gujar women appeared to be adornment-obsessed. They wore tight, wrinkled-at-the-ankles trousers. They wore enormous silver rings made from melted silver rupees in their ears. They were from the pastoral era. The women went to the river to get fresh water for their large brass gurrahs (pitchers).

Q . How did the Gujar woman react as she stepped upon the stepping stones?

The crocodile lunged at the Gujar woman as she approached the stepping stones and lashed at her leg.

Q. How did she respond when the crocodile assaulted women?

The woman yelled and clattered both brass pots onto the boulder. The Gujar woman retreated from the crocodile, but she landed on a bone-breaking stone at the same time. To save herself, she clutched one of the timber logs.

Q. How would you describe the woman’s struggle with the crocodile?

The Gujar woman backed away from the crocodile, but his teeth clamped down on her leg just as she tripped and fell on the bone-crushing stone, clutching one of the timber logs for protection.

Q..How did Sibia come to the woman’s aid so quickly?

When Sibia noticed the woman being attacked by the crocodile, she sprang from boulder to boulder like a rock goat, aimed for the crocodile’s eye, and then slammed the hayfork into its eyes with all

Q.What else did Sibia miss on her way home?

Sibia was so enthralled by her discovery of the blue bead that she didn’t notice the thin singing of malaria mosquitoes among trees, nor was she concerned that she might run into the dangerous old makna elephant—the Tuskless One—or that the stars had appeared in the sky and night was approaching.

Q.Why didn’t Sibia inform her mother about her crocodile struggle or how she rescued the woman?

Sibia was so ecstatic that she had discovered the blue bead and could now build a necklace that everything else seemed irrelevant. The only thing that mattered to her was that she could finally get the jewelry she had always desired but couldn’t afford.

 

 

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