short questions and answers of ‘My Own True Family’

My Own True Family

 

SUMMERY

The poem is told in the form of a dream. A child wanders into an oak wood in search of a stag and encounters an elderly woman. Her clothes were worn out and she was frail and feeble. She reveals that she carries his secret in her small bag. When she says this, the woman laughs a strange, harsh sound, which makes the boy tremble in fear. She takes out her small bag and casts a spell on the child. Suddenly, the poet finds himself surrounded by a tribe and tied to a stake.

The purpose of writing a poem
Edward James Ted Hughes, the noted Poet Laureate, wrote this famous and remarkable poem. The poem is about human beings’ hypocrisy in exploiting Mother Nature for their own selfish gain and never attempting to heal her wounds.

The poem could be interpreted as a dialogue between the artificial and natural worlds. Through the oak trees, the poet hears the natural world’s repressed voice, which transforms his mind and thought.

1.How did the old woman become a member of my true family?

The poet was suddenly surrounded by a tribe and tied to a stake after the old woman began to shake her bag in a magical way. The tribes were made up entirely of oak trees, who told the poet that they were his own true kin.

2.What are the priorities of my own true family?

The poet presented the oak-tree as his own true kin. The poem describes a young child’s mystical encounter in an Oakwood and suggests that humans and trees should coexist as a single family. It emphasises the importance of protecting our natural environment for the sake of humanity’s well-being.

3.How do the trees suffer?

Please provide an answer. Answer: As if in agony, the trees writhe and twist, their branches bent in strange ways. The metal contraptions that squeeze and pull each plant almost seem inhuman, resembling nothing more than a torture device.

4.Why did the poet wake up twice?

Ted Hughes’ poem “Our Own True Family” depicts a poet searching for a stag in an oakwood. There he found a frail old lady with a small bag who was “all knobbly stick and rag.” By opening the bag and magically putting the poet to sleep, she cast a spell on him. He began to dream, and as a result, he awoke twice.

5.What was the old lady’s first reaction?

Ans: The old woman’s first reaction was to cackle, which caused the poet to tremble and be terrified.

6. “I awoke twice” — Who was it that awoke twice? Why did the poet wake up twice?

When the old woman opened her little bag, the poet awoke twice.

The poet’s inner consciousness was awakened for the first time when he discovered the cruelty that humans have perpetrated against nature. This awakening of his inner self aided in the awakening of his outer self, allowing him to form a bond with nature.

7.If the poet did not curse, what did the oak trees say?

The oak trees warned the poet that unless he swore to plant more oak trees, the black oak bark would wrinkle over him and root him among the oaks unless he swore to plant more oak trees.

8. What does it mean when someone says, “You were born but never grew”?

Ans: The term ‘grew’ refers to the poet’s mental growth. Despite being born in the midst of oak trees, the poet’s mental development of protecting the oak trees does not grow, according to the oak trees.

9.”My walk was like that of a human child, but my heart was like that of a tree” — What does this line imply?

 

Ans: The poet means “my walk was the walk of a human child, but my heart was a tree” when he says “my walk was the walk of a human child, but my heart was a tree.” His moral self is now attached to the oak trees and their pain and suffering, despite the fact that he is still physically a human being.

10.Did the poet have to make a promise?

Ans: The poet had to pledge that if he saw one oak tree being felled, he would plant two oak trees.

11.How did the poet find his way in?

Ans: The poet crawled into a thicket of oak trees.

12.What is the poem’s message?

Ans: The poem’s message is that we must preserve our natural environment for the sake of humanity’s welfare.

13.When the old lady opened her small purse, what did the poet see?

Ans: The poet discovered himself surrounded by a staring tribe of oak trees and bound to a stake when the old lady opened her little bag.
14.What was the poet’s reason for waking up twice?

Ted Hughes’ poem “Our Own True Family” depicts a poet searching for a stag in an oakwood. There he found a frail old lady with a small bag who was “all knobbly stick and rag.” By opening the bag and magically putting the poet to sleep, she cast a spell on him. He began to dream, and as a result, he awoke twice.

15th. What did the poet hope to find?

Answer: The poet was on the prowl for a stag.

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